Thoughts To Live By…

Archive for March 22nd, 2012

Author: Emma Sarran

Let me start by being completely, um, honest. Every once in a while, we ladies have been known to play a little fast and loose with the truth around you guys. Believe me, we do it with the purest of intentions (really!). And rather than try to change us, your best bet—for keeping your woman happy and your sanity intact—is to simply recognize what’s going on and be smooth about it. With that in mind, here are seven lies we commonly tell men, and how to handle them. Just trust me on this stuff, OK?

1. “Give me your completely honest opinion…”

Now would be a good time to fake a heart attack.

What we really mean: “Tell me what I want to hear.

What to do about it: I know, it’s confusing as hell. We say “seriously,” and “I really want the truth,” but the chances that we actually want the truth are about as good as the chances you want us to tell you that it’s OK, size really doesn’t matter. There are even times when women think we’re prepared for honesty and even then, when it comes out, it just plain sucks. So err on the side of safety (and of grateful-for-the-white-lie affection), and tell me…I’m hotter than that chick, this dress does not make my butt look big, my mom isn’t overbearing at all…and you’ll be golden.

2. “I’m fine. Really.”

Hint: if there are tissues involved, she’s probably not fine.

What we really mean: “I’m as far from fine as can be.”

What to do about it: No matter how much it may seem we want you to leave us alone with that simple statement, we don’t. The worst thing you can do in this situation is say, “OK, good,” and end the conversation. Instead, we want you to show some serious concern until we’re ready to actually voice what’s wrong. It’s all about making us feel like our happiness is a priority. Want some extra points? Throw in a line about how you’re not going anywhere until you’re sure everything is OK. We. Will. Swoon.

3. “I’ve slept with X number of guys.”

Way to go, buddy! You picked the perfect shade for that wall.

What we really mean: “I’ve slept with just a few more than X number of guys.”

What to do about it: Remember the “rule of three” made famous by American Pie? (Guys have slept with three fewer women than they say, and vice versa.) Well, the magic number may not always be three, but the idea is founded in truth.  The reason we omit a few escapades from our history is because we’re ever fearful of being seen as “easy”—and don’t they all say that easy girls don’t land the guys in the long run? Want the truth? Make us feel confident that your opinion of us doesn’t lie with our sexual history—and that no matter how many guys we’ve been with in the past, we’re still pure in your eyes. Simply reaffirming those things (and consistent acts of chivalry—flowers, romantic dates, time with our families and friends to show your interest outside of sex), will have us more inclined to be honest about our pasts, and to keep our bedroom doors open.

4. “Yeah, that was GREAT. I totally got off.”

“What is it, honey? I promise to work harder on my pecs!”

What we really mean: “That was good, but I didn’t get off and I probably won’t. Now I’m tired and ready to spoon.”

What to do about it: Don’t take it personally (well, unless this is a regular occurrence—then, you might want to try some new in-bed strategies). Sometimes, it just doesn’t happen for us—and that doesn’t mean the sex wasn’t good. Don’t badger us about what exactly was so “GREAT.” Simply accept our evaluation for the day and move on.

5. Oh my God, I LOVE sports!

Just in it for the buffalo wings, we’re guessing.

What we really mean: “I love putting on a cute jersey and tossing back red-headed sluts while my hometown team is winning.”

What to do about it: Just humor us. It’s fun to jump on the sports bandwagon—and yes, sometimes we might be trying to impress you and your Sunday-Funday-inclined friends by joining in on the debauchery. But, chances are if you ask me any details about stats or players (at least post the championship ’90s Chicago Bulls dream team—yes, I’m looking at you, BJ Armstrong), I’ll come up short. So, invite me to hang when you’re heading to your favorite sports bar every once in a while, and save the quizzes for your equally obsessed buds.

6. “Sure, go out and have a guys’ night!”

Her worst nightmare: you having fun without her.

What we really mean: “I’d really rather you hang out with me.”

What to do about it: It’s not that we don’t want you to have your own friends, or your own life. We just want it to fit conveniently into our own lives. Translation: please try to plan your guys’ nights to align with my girls’ nights—and prepare for me to call and text you to meet up once my girlfriends start taking shots and pairing off with the gropey guys on the dance floor. Another good time to hang out with your boys: when I’m out of town (though I’ll still secretly wish you were sitting in your apartment moping and waiting for my nightly phone call).

7. “I’ve never cheated on anyone.”

She’s not cheating. They’re just really good arm-wrestling buddies.

What we really mean: “I may have cheated on someone before, but I’m afraid that if tell you, you won’t think of me as sweet and relationship-worthy anymore.”

What to do about it: Let’s face it—throughout time, we women have been scarred by the idea of guys who just want to get us into their beds, but keep our toothbrushes as far from their places as possible. You “relationship” guys are few and far between, so sue us if we’re inclined to hold on tightly when we find one of you. And part of that may mean keeping mum on that one little slip-up we had after the sophomore year foam party. It’s possible that, if you sincerely assure us it won’t affect our current goings-on, we’ll tell you the truth—but don’t count on it. The fear of losing a could-be great love is one a lady doesn’t take lightly.

http://www.mademan.com/warning-7-lies-all-women-tell-men/

By Sue Rose, MS, RD

Blood triglycerides may be an important factor in your risk for heart disease. Your doctor may become concerned if your cholesterol level is too high. But another type of fatty substance found in the blood, known as triglycerides, may also need to be monitored in the effort to prevent heart disease. That is because research has identified high triglyceride levels as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, even when cholesterol levels are normal.

What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a form of fat present in food, human body fat, and blood. Blood triglyceride levels are affected by dietary fat and are manufactured in the body from other energy sources, such as carbohydrates. Triglycerides are also stored as body fat.

An elevation of blood triglycerides is referred to as hypertriglyceridemia . The blood test to measure triglyceride levels is easy and can be done along with a routine blood test that also measures various types of cholesterol. (The most accurate results are obtained when a person fasts before this test.) Triglyceride levels can be quite variable, so several measurements may be needed to provide accurate baseline values.

How High Is Too High?

An elevated triglyceride level can be an independent medical problem or can be due to another existing medical problem. For instance, people with poorly controlled type 1 or type 2 diabetes often have elevated triglyceride levels. Elevated triglycerides can also be brought on by thyroid disorders , kidney problems, obesity , excess alcohol, and taking certain medicines.

The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) classifies the ranges of fasting triglyceride levels in the following way:

  • Normal—less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) (1.7 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high—150-199 mg/dL (1.7-2.2 mmol/L)
  • High—200-499 mg/dL (2.3-5.6 mmol/L)
  • Very high—more than or equal to 500 mg/dL (5.7 mmol/L)

Studies have found that high triglycerides levels may increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other conditions. There are steps that you can take, though, to lower your levels.

Ways to Tame Triglycerides

Here are some tips from the experts:

  • Increase physical activity —Aerobic exercise can help with weight loss and can decrease triglyceride levels at the same time. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days of the week. But, first get approval from your doctor.
  • Maintain a healthy weight—Studies have shown losing weight and maintaining an ideal weight to be associated with decreased levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.
  • Cut down on carbs —Carbohydrates are basically divided into two categories: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates tend to be sweet, such as soft drinks, desserts, candies, and syrup. Complex carbohydrates are found in bread, pasta, rice, fruits, and vegetables. If recommended by your doctor, reduce your intake of simple carbs.
  • Eat more fruits, veggies, and low-fat dairy products—Include these choices as part of your healthy diet.
  • Choose fats wisely —Instead of choosing foods high in saturated and trans fats, pick food that contains unsaturated fat. Examples include certain oils (eg, olive, corn, canola), nuts, seeds, avocados, and food with omega-3 fatty acids (eg, fish, flaxseed).
  • Eat more fish —Omega-3 fatty acids are found in all types of fish, but are more abundant in fatty fish like mackerel, salmon, sardines, and herring. Other good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include tofu, soybeans, flaxseed, canola oil, nuts, and green leafy vegetables.
  • Limit alcohol —According to the American Heart Association (AHA), small amounts of alcohol can increase triglyceride levels.

RESOURCES:

American Heart Association http://www.americanheart.org/

National Cholesterol Education Program http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/ncep/index.htm/

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

Dietitians of Canada http://www.dietitians.ca/

Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index_e.html/

References

Austin MA, et al. Cardiovascular disease mortality in familial forms of hypertriglyceridemia: a 20-year prospective study. Circulation . 2000;101:2777-2782.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical activity for everyone: how much physical activity do adults need? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html. Updated May 10, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2010.

DynaMed Editorial Team. Hypertriglyceridemia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php. Updated June 10, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2010.

National Cholesterol Education Program website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/ncep/index.htm .

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov .

Triglycerides. American Heart Association website. Available at: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4778. Accessed June 15, 2010.

http://www.lifescript.com/special/managing_your_high_cholesterol/how_much_do_you_know_about_triglycerides.aspx?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Cholesterol_Manage

Myth #1: Normal blood pressure is anything below 140/90 mmHg

The most recent National Health, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines set systolic BP of less than 120mmHg and diastolic BP of less than 80mmHg (i.e. less than 120/80) as normal.  This is significantly different than the old standard of 140/90 your doctor may still be using.

Myth #2: If you have high blood pressure, you need prescription drugs to lower it

There are many non-prescription blood pressure lowering treatments that are equally as powerful as drugs and offer one huge benefit that drugs alone do not. The fact is many natural treatments are equally effective as compared to drugs, especially when used in combination.

  • Exercise helps with weight reduction and reduces BP.
  • Be certain to get plenty of sleep – 7 to 8 hours per night.
  • Consider Vitamin D supplementation.

Myth #3: Men are the only ones who need to worry about high blood pressure

Unfortunately, the very opposite. High blood pressure affects men, women and children, young and old.

Myth #4: Salt is the main cause of high blood pressure

While table salt and sodium, found in soup, processed meats and frozen foods, can raise blood pressure, there are many other factors that increase the risk of high blood pressure, including family history, age, obesity and diet, certain diseases, among others.

Myth #5: You will always have physical symptoms of high blood pressure

High blood pressure is a silent disease and can strike without presenting any symptoms whatsoever. This is why everyone is encouraged to get regular check ups, watch their diet and make exercise a priority. A healthy lifestyle is the best defense against high blood pressure and hypertension.

http://www.healthcentral.com/high-blood-pressure/cf/slideshows/top-5-myths-about-high-blood-pressure/myth-1-normal-blood-pressure-is-anything-below-14090-mmhg/?ap=825


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