Thoughts To Live By…

How to prevent premature ageing

If you think how well you age is all down to your genes, think again; there are actually many things you can do to help ward off wrinkles. To help keep your skin youthful and supple, check out these 7 ways to beat wrinkles and premature ageing.

Protect yourself from the sun

Premature ageing is often seen as unavoidable and a natural part of getting older; however, up to 90 per cent of the visible signs of ageing are caused by the sun, even though they may not show up until years after sun exposure has occurred. To help avoid premature ageing, wear an SPF of at least factor 15 every day (even on cloudy days as UV rays can penetrate clouds) and switch to a higher SPF when the sun is at its strongest.

Cut down on sugar

While the majority of premature ageing is caused by sun exposure, poor diets can also be to blame for wrinkles. Sugar is a staple of many people’s diets, yet is also a leading cause of skin ageing. When blood sugar levels are high a process called glycation occurs which damages the collagen in your skin. Once damaged, the collagen hardens, leading to wrinkles and sagging. To keep skin firm and smooth, make sure you check the sugar content of products and cut down on sugary foods.

Stop smoking

Smoking is not only notoriously bad for our health and a major cause of cancer and heart disease, it can also be disastrous for your appearance. Cigarette smoke can irritate the skin and deprive it of oxygen and nutrients, while the act of smoking can cause wrinkles to appear around the mouth. If you are a smoker, one of the best things you can do for your appearance and health is to try to break the habit now.

Keep skin well hydrated

In order to keep your skin supple and smooth, it is essential to keep it hydrated both inside and out. Make sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day to maintain your skin’s moisture levels, and eat foods such as fruit and vegetables which have a high water content. To moisturise the skin from the outside, use a moisturiser suitable for your skin type or hydrating oils such as vitamin E, avocado or almond oil. Also, it may be worth getting a humidifier to counteract the drying effects of central heating and air conditioning.

Get your eyes tested

The area around your eyes can be one of the first places to display signs of ageing such as fine lines and crow’s feet, and these can be exacerbated by unconscious frowning or squinting caused by poor eyesight. If you find yourself regularly squinting to see better, it is important for both your health and appearance to get your eyes checked and invest in some glasses or contact lenses if required.

Eat wrinkle-busting foods

To help ward off wrinkles, try to eat a diet full of antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids help to keep skin supple and nourished from within, preventing dehydration and dryness, while antioxidants help fight against the free radicals that cause wrinkles. Good foods to stock up on include oily fish, flax seeds and antioxidant-rich berries. Spinach is also a good source of lutein, which recent research has shown can prevent wrinkles by helping to retain the skin’s moisture and elasticity, increasing lipid levels and preventing damage caused by free radicals.

Avoid stress

You might not think that your state of mind has much to do with the state of your appearance, but this is not the case. In fact, a study has shown that chronic stress can actually accelerate cellular ageing, leading to wrinkles. To help keep your skin wrinkle-free, try experimenting with some stress-busting techniques to help cope with stressful situations, such as meditation, exercise or yoga.

http://www.realbuzz.com/articles/7-ways-to-beat-wrinkles/

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Seven surprising health and fitness figures

From your BMI to your heart rate, healthy living often revolves around numbers. However, here are 7 surprising health statistics you may be unaware of.

One in 10 parents think cola counts as fruit

According to a survey of family eating habits by food company Green Giant, one in 10 parents in Britain believe that drinking cola counts towards their five recommended portions of fruit and veg. Not only that, one in 10 of those surveyed also believed that chips contributed to the 5-a-day health campaign, while one in five thought that fruit-flavoured sweets counted towards this target. Surprisingly, one in 20 of those questioned, did not however believe that oranges or bananas counted towards their portions of fruit and veg.

One in six women would rather be blind than fat

While many of us would pay good money for the perfect body, research by Arizona State University found that a lot of women would give up a great deal more if it meant being slim – including their eyesight. According to this survey, a surprising one in six women would rather be blind than be obese. Furthermore, many women stated they would prefer alcoholism or catching herpes to being overweight, while one in four would prefer to suffer from depression.

48 per cent of women want cosmetic surgery

Research findings published in the Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery suggest that body satisfaction and confidence for women are at an all time low. According to this survey, a huge 48 per cent of women surveyed would be interested in having cosmetic surgery, while a further 23 per cent would possibly be interested. Although men’s interest in surgery was significantly lower, 23 per cent of men still claimed to be interested in surgery, while 17 per cent would potentially be.

One third of all cancers are preventable

Cancer is the biggest premature killer, accounting for 40% of premature deaths. However, while experts are unclear about the causes of some forms of cancer, the World Health Organization has revealed that one third of all cancers can actually be prevented by careful lifestyle choices. Some of the main preventable causes of cancer include smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, alcohol, infection and environmental pollution.

Smokers lose one third of their everyday memory

While there are many shocking statistics related to smoking (such as that approximately every 6 seconds, someone dies due to tobacco) perhaps a less well known one is that, on top of many of the well publicised health effects of smoking, it can also cause smokers to lose one third of their everyday memory. According to the study by Northumbria University, smokers performed significantly worse in memory tests than those who did not smoke; however, they found that kicking the habit restored their ability to recollect information.

Only six per cent of Americans exercise for 30 minutes a day

The general recommendation for good health and fitness for adults is to get a minimum of 30 minutes daily exercise. However, according to a Cooking Light Insight survey, only six per cent of Americans meet this recommendation. Though a further 22 per cent claim to exercise three to four times per week, this still leaves a high percentage of people who are failing to exercise regularly and therefore increasing their risk of obesity and heart disease.

You could unknowingly eat 46 teaspoons of sugar a day

You may not think that your diet is too high in sugar, but even if you steer clear of desserts and chocolate, you could still be eating well over the recommended maximum sugar intake. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, food companies have been increasing the sugar content of processed foods to make them more appetising, meaning that many are unaware of how much they are eating. The study showed that some people are unknowingly eating up to 46 teaspoons a day, increasing their risk of health conditions including heart disease.

http://www.realbuzz.com/articles/7-shocking-health-statistics/

10 guilt-inducing activities that actually boost your health

Ever promised yourself that this year you were definitely going to give that bad habit the flick, only to give into your vice again after only a couple of hours? Well, the good news is that ‘bad’ habit may not actually be as harmful as you think. Here are 10 common ‘bad’ habits that are actually good for your health.

Gossiping

Most of us love a good gossip, whether we’re giggling over a colleague’s new romance or passing an opinion on someone’s outfit choice or behaviour, and the good news is that gossiping could actually be good for us. Not only does listening to gossip help us to learn more about the characters of those around us, bonding and having a laugh with your peers also releases feel-good hormones which help to relieve stress and anxiety.

Drinking coffee

Although drinking too much coffee can be detrimental to your health, in smaller quantities the popular hot drink can actually be good for you. When drunk in moderation (no more than three cups per day), caffeine can speed up your metabolism, boost exercise endurance and reduce your risk of gallstones and kidney stones. A study by the Harvard Medical School has also found that women who drink two or more cups of coffee a day are less likely to be depressed, while separate research has shown that drinking three cups cuts risk of age-related diabetes.

Fidgeting

It’s the bane of school teachers everywhere, yet research suggests that fidgeting may be no bad thing – at least in us adults. Research suggests that fidgeting can burn up to 350 extra calories a day, helping you to keep off those excess pounds. To further increase your calorie burn, try to squeeze in more incidental exercise, such as getting up to change the channel rather than using the remote control.

Swearing

Swearing: it’s not big and it’s not clever… but studies suggest that in certain situations it may actually be good for you. According to a study by the University of East Anglia, swearing at work could help employees cope with stress and maintain solidarity. Meanwhile, researchers at Keele University’s School of Psychology found that swearing can provide effective short-term relief from pain. However, the study also notes that swearing should be reserved for crises only, as the higher the daily swearing frequency was for participants, the less pain relief they experienced.

Skipping a shower

OK, so repeatedly missing showers may not win you any friends, but if you are ever tempted to skip a shower here and there, research suggests that you could be doing your health (and the environment) a favour. Daily washing not only strips your skin of the natural oils that keep it hydrated and supple, it could also strip your skin of good bacteria that help to prevent disease. If you do decide to skip a shower, just try to do it on a day when you won’t be vigorously working out!

Losing your temper

Many of us have been brought up to believe that losing our temper is the ultimate social faux pas. To an extent this is true (nobody wants to hang out with that person who is always losing their cool and shouting their mouth off), however research has found that losing your temper could actually be good for your health. Venting your emotions is believed to reduce the effects of stress, while a Swedish study found that men who bottled up their anger when unfairly treated at work doubled their risk of having a heart attack.

Sunbathing

In recent years, official advice has been that we should cover up in the sun at all times to protect ourselves from skin cancer. However, more recently experts have stated that actually little and frequent sun exposure is good for us. In the UK, where vitamin D deficiency is common, seven leading health groups and charities have issued a statement advising everyone to spend 10 minutes in the midday sun without sunblock in order to avoid rickets. Meanwhile, a US study has stated that the vitamin D produced by the sun could help ward off colds and flu. However, experts have stressed that people should cover up after 10 minutes, and skin should never be red at the end of the day.

Having a lie-in

Feeling guilty about your weekend lie-in? Don’t be! Research has found that sleep can help you live longer, boost your memory and reduce stress, while not getting enough can lead to accidents, weight gain, and increased risk of heart disease. Furthermore, delaying your morning workout in favour of some shut-eye may have health benefits, as research from Brunel University found that heavy training sessions early in the morning can compromise the immune system.

Giving in to your cravings

Although constantly giving into junk food cravings is a sure-fire way to sabotage your healthy eating success, allowing yourself the odd treat will not only boost your happiness, it will also help you keep motivated to stay on track. Also, as many people crave the foods that they most attempt to resist, allowing yourself a little of what you fancy can actually help to reduce cravings. If you have imposed extreme restrictions on your diet and cut out entire food groups, cravings could also be a sign of a nutrient deficiency in your diet.

Daydreaming

Many of us view daydreaming as a sign of laziness or form of procrastination; however, researchers at the University of British Columbia have found that letting your mind wander can actually help boost your problem-solving abilities. The study found that when participants minds wandered, the parts of their brain associated with problem-solving became more active than when focused on routine tasks. So, while daydreaming can increase the time it takes to complete your present task, it can allow you to unconsciously sort through other important problems in your life

http://www.realbuzz.com/articles/10-bad-habits-that-are-good-for-you/#pagination-top

Drinking water

 

While we are probably all familiar with the advice to drink eight glasses of water a day, more recent research has suggested that there is actually no scientific evidence supporting this recommendation and that drinking excessive amounts of water can actually be dangerous by lowering the concentration of salt in your blood. Health-conscious water drinkers should also be wary of the trend for drinking bottled water, as studies have suggested that the chemicals (phthalates) from plastic bottles can leach into water and disrupt hormone levels.

Talking over your problems

Talking through your problems can be a great way to gain some perspective and get things off your chest. However, studies have suggested that, after a certain point, rehashing and dwelling on problems can actually be bad for your health. According to research, revisiting and analyzing the same problems with friends (“co-rumination”) can lead to anxiety, stress disorders and depression. Next time a problem arises, by all means talk it over with a friend, but try to focus on problem-solving rather than simply dwelling on the issue.

Sipping on mocktails

You may think that by swapping cocktails for mocktails you are doing your health a favour, but this may not actually be the case. While cutting down on alcohol is beneficial for your wellbeing, mocktails are often high in refined sugar which research suggests is just as damaging and addictive as alcohol. For a safer swap and a shot of nutrients, make sure you stick to mocktails made from pure fruit juices instead of those made from syrups.

Early morning workouts

While a daily workout is great for your health, studies suggest that getting up for early morning exercise may not be as ideal as it seems. A study by a researcher from Brunel University, Middlesex, found that heavy training sessions early in the morning can compromise the immune system and put athletes at increased risk of bacterial and viral infection. While a morning jog or gentle exercise session is unlikely to put you at risk, it may be better to save heavier workouts for later in the day.

Taking nutritional supplements

We all know that vitamins are good for us, but relying on nutritional supplements can actually be bad for your health. Separate studies have shown that high doses of vitamin supplements including iron, magnesium and vitamin B6 raise the death rate of older women, while taking vitamin E can increase men’s risk of prostate cancer. While certain people may be required to take vitamins (those with low levels of vitamin D, for example, or vegans who may be deficient in vitamin B12), for most people a better approach is to opt for a varied diet full of fruit and vegetables which will give you all the nutrients you need.

Slathering on sunscreen

Official advice for many years has warned about the dangers of skin cancer, causing many of us to take measures to cover up in the sun at all times. However, while it is extremely important to protect your skin, experts have more recently advised that little and frequent sun exposure is good for us, preventing vitamin D deficiency, which can lead to rickets, osteomalacia and depression. Official advice in the UK, where rickets has recently made a comeback, is to spend 10 minutes in the midday sun without sunblock each day before covering skin up.

Switching to low fat foods

When getting started in healthy eating, it is tempting to opt for low fat foods in order to help keep off excess pounds. However, cutting out ‘good’ fats such as omega-3 fatty acids could be detrimental to your health. Omega-3 fatty acids, found in oily fish, walnuts and flaxseeds, not only help to keep skin supple and wrinkle-free, they are also essential for good brain and heart health and can help prevent arthritis.

http://ph.she.yahoo.com/7-good-habits-bad-health-090000188.html

Author: Emma Sarran

Let me start by being completely, um, honest. Every once in a while, we ladies have been known to play a little fast and loose with the truth around you guys. Believe me, we do it with the purest of intentions (really!). And rather than try to change us, your best bet—for keeping your woman happy and your sanity intact—is to simply recognize what’s going on and be smooth about it. With that in mind, here are seven lies we commonly tell men, and how to handle them. Just trust me on this stuff, OK?

1. “Give me your completely honest opinion…”

Now would be a good time to fake a heart attack.

What we really mean: “Tell me what I want to hear.

What to do about it: I know, it’s confusing as hell. We say “seriously,” and “I really want the truth,” but the chances that we actually want the truth are about as good as the chances you want us to tell you that it’s OK, size really doesn’t matter. There are even times when women think we’re prepared for honesty and even then, when it comes out, it just plain sucks. So err on the side of safety (and of grateful-for-the-white-lie affection), and tell me…I’m hotter than that chick, this dress does not make my butt look big, my mom isn’t overbearing at all…and you’ll be golden.

2. “I’m fine. Really.”

Hint: if there are tissues involved, she’s probably not fine.

What we really mean: “I’m as far from fine as can be.”

What to do about it: No matter how much it may seem we want you to leave us alone with that simple statement, we don’t. The worst thing you can do in this situation is say, “OK, good,” and end the conversation. Instead, we want you to show some serious concern until we’re ready to actually voice what’s wrong. It’s all about making us feel like our happiness is a priority. Want some extra points? Throw in a line about how you’re not going anywhere until you’re sure everything is OK. We. Will. Swoon.

3. “I’ve slept with X number of guys.”

Way to go, buddy! You picked the perfect shade for that wall.

What we really mean: “I’ve slept with just a few more than X number of guys.”

What to do about it: Remember the “rule of three” made famous by American Pie? (Guys have slept with three fewer women than they say, and vice versa.) Well, the magic number may not always be three, but the idea is founded in truth.  The reason we omit a few escapades from our history is because we’re ever fearful of being seen as “easy”—and don’t they all say that easy girls don’t land the guys in the long run? Want the truth? Make us feel confident that your opinion of us doesn’t lie with our sexual history—and that no matter how many guys we’ve been with in the past, we’re still pure in your eyes. Simply reaffirming those things (and consistent acts of chivalry—flowers, romantic dates, time with our families and friends to show your interest outside of sex), will have us more inclined to be honest about our pasts, and to keep our bedroom doors open.

4. “Yeah, that was GREAT. I totally got off.”

“What is it, honey? I promise to work harder on my pecs!”

What we really mean: “That was good, but I didn’t get off and I probably won’t. Now I’m tired and ready to spoon.”

What to do about it: Don’t take it personally (well, unless this is a regular occurrence—then, you might want to try some new in-bed strategies). Sometimes, it just doesn’t happen for us—and that doesn’t mean the sex wasn’t good. Don’t badger us about what exactly was so “GREAT.” Simply accept our evaluation for the day and move on.

5. Oh my God, I LOVE sports!

Just in it for the buffalo wings, we’re guessing.

What we really mean: “I love putting on a cute jersey and tossing back red-headed sluts while my hometown team is winning.”

What to do about it: Just humor us. It’s fun to jump on the sports bandwagon—and yes, sometimes we might be trying to impress you and your Sunday-Funday-inclined friends by joining in on the debauchery. But, chances are if you ask me any details about stats or players (at least post the championship ’90s Chicago Bulls dream team—yes, I’m looking at you, BJ Armstrong), I’ll come up short. So, invite me to hang when you’re heading to your favorite sports bar every once in a while, and save the quizzes for your equally obsessed buds.

6. “Sure, go out and have a guys’ night!”

Her worst nightmare: you having fun without her.

What we really mean: “I’d really rather you hang out with me.”

What to do about it: It’s not that we don’t want you to have your own friends, or your own life. We just want it to fit conveniently into our own lives. Translation: please try to plan your guys’ nights to align with my girls’ nights—and prepare for me to call and text you to meet up once my girlfriends start taking shots and pairing off with the gropey guys on the dance floor. Another good time to hang out with your boys: when I’m out of town (though I’ll still secretly wish you were sitting in your apartment moping and waiting for my nightly phone call).

7. “I’ve never cheated on anyone.”

She’s not cheating. They’re just really good arm-wrestling buddies.

What we really mean: “I may have cheated on someone before, but I’m afraid that if tell you, you won’t think of me as sweet and relationship-worthy anymore.”

What to do about it: Let’s face it—throughout time, we women have been scarred by the idea of guys who just want to get us into their beds, but keep our toothbrushes as far from their places as possible. You “relationship” guys are few and far between, so sue us if we’re inclined to hold on tightly when we find one of you. And part of that may mean keeping mum on that one little slip-up we had after the sophomore year foam party. It’s possible that, if you sincerely assure us it won’t affect our current goings-on, we’ll tell you the truth—but don’t count on it. The fear of losing a could-be great love is one a lady doesn’t take lightly.

http://www.mademan.com/warning-7-lies-all-women-tell-men/

By Sue Rose, MS, RD

Blood triglycerides may be an important factor in your risk for heart disease. Your doctor may become concerned if your cholesterol level is too high. But another type of fatty substance found in the blood, known as triglycerides, may also need to be monitored in the effort to prevent heart disease. That is because research has identified high triglyceride levels as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, even when cholesterol levels are normal.

What Are Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a form of fat present in food, human body fat, and blood. Blood triglyceride levels are affected by dietary fat and are manufactured in the body from other energy sources, such as carbohydrates. Triglycerides are also stored as body fat.

An elevation of blood triglycerides is referred to as hypertriglyceridemia . The blood test to measure triglyceride levels is easy and can be done along with a routine blood test that also measures various types of cholesterol. (The most accurate results are obtained when a person fasts before this test.) Triglyceride levels can be quite variable, so several measurements may be needed to provide accurate baseline values.

How High Is Too High?

An elevated triglyceride level can be an independent medical problem or can be due to another existing medical problem. For instance, people with poorly controlled type 1 or type 2 diabetes often have elevated triglyceride levels. Elevated triglycerides can also be brought on by thyroid disorders , kidney problems, obesity , excess alcohol, and taking certain medicines.

The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) classifies the ranges of fasting triglyceride levels in the following way:

  • Normal—less than 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) (1.7 mmol/L)
  • Borderline high—150-199 mg/dL (1.7-2.2 mmol/L)
  • High—200-499 mg/dL (2.3-5.6 mmol/L)
  • Very high—more than or equal to 500 mg/dL (5.7 mmol/L)

Studies have found that high triglycerides levels may increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other conditions. There are steps that you can take, though, to lower your levels.

Ways to Tame Triglycerides

Here are some tips from the experts:

  • Increase physical activity —Aerobic exercise can help with weight loss and can decrease triglyceride levels at the same time. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days of the week. But, first get approval from your doctor.
  • Maintain a healthy weight—Studies have shown losing weight and maintaining an ideal weight to be associated with decreased levels of triglycerides and cholesterol.
  • Cut down on carbs —Carbohydrates are basically divided into two categories: simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates tend to be sweet, such as soft drinks, desserts, candies, and syrup. Complex carbohydrates are found in bread, pasta, rice, fruits, and vegetables. If recommended by your doctor, reduce your intake of simple carbs.
  • Eat more fruits, veggies, and low-fat dairy products—Include these choices as part of your healthy diet.
  • Choose fats wisely —Instead of choosing foods high in saturated and trans fats, pick food that contains unsaturated fat. Examples include certain oils (eg, olive, corn, canola), nuts, seeds, avocados, and food with omega-3 fatty acids (eg, fish, flaxseed).
  • Eat more fish —Omega-3 fatty acids are found in all types of fish, but are more abundant in fatty fish like mackerel, salmon, sardines, and herring. Other good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include tofu, soybeans, flaxseed, canola oil, nuts, and green leafy vegetables.
  • Limit alcohol —According to the American Heart Association (AHA), small amounts of alcohol can increase triglyceride levels.

RESOURCES:

American Heart Association http://www.americanheart.org/

National Cholesterol Education Program http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/ncep/index.htm/

CANADIAN RESOURCES:

Dietitians of Canada http://www.dietitians.ca/

Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index_e.html/

References

Austin MA, et al. Cardiovascular disease mortality in familial forms of hypertriglyceridemia: a 20-year prospective study. Circulation . 2000;101:2777-2782.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Physical activity for everyone: how much physical activity do adults need? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html. Updated May 10, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2010.

DynaMed Editorial Team. Hypertriglyceridemia. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php. Updated June 10, 2010. Accessed June 15, 2010.

National Cholesterol Education Program website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/ncep/index.htm .

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov .

Triglycerides. American Heart Association website. Available at: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4778. Accessed June 15, 2010.

http://www.lifescript.com/special/managing_your_high_cholesterol/how_much_do_you_know_about_triglycerides.aspx?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Cholesterol_Manage

Myth #1: Normal blood pressure is anything below 140/90 mmHg

The most recent National Health, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines set systolic BP of less than 120mmHg and diastolic BP of less than 80mmHg (i.e. less than 120/80) as normal.  This is significantly different than the old standard of 140/90 your doctor may still be using.

Myth #2: If you have high blood pressure, you need prescription drugs to lower it

There are many non-prescription blood pressure lowering treatments that are equally as powerful as drugs and offer one huge benefit that drugs alone do not. The fact is many natural treatments are equally effective as compared to drugs, especially when used in combination.

  • Exercise helps with weight reduction and reduces BP.
  • Be certain to get plenty of sleep – 7 to 8 hours per night.
  • Consider Vitamin D supplementation.

Myth #3: Men are the only ones who need to worry about high blood pressure

Unfortunately, the very opposite. High blood pressure affects men, women and children, young and old.

Myth #4: Salt is the main cause of high blood pressure

While table salt and sodium, found in soup, processed meats and frozen foods, can raise blood pressure, there are many other factors that increase the risk of high blood pressure, including family history, age, obesity and diet, certain diseases, among others.

Myth #5: You will always have physical symptoms of high blood pressure

High blood pressure is a silent disease and can strike without presenting any symptoms whatsoever. This is why everyone is encouraged to get regular check ups, watch their diet and make exercise a priority. A healthy lifestyle is the best defense against high blood pressure and hypertension.

http://www.healthcentral.com/high-blood-pressure/cf/slideshows/top-5-myths-about-high-blood-pressure/myth-1-normal-blood-pressure-is-anything-below-14090-mmhg/?ap=825

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